Hyundai’s future mobility plans include wearable robotic assistants

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“The automaker is focusing its personal robotic efforts around “wearable robots,” or robotic exoskeleton devices that can supplement or augment the mobility of their wearer. These efforts are organized around three different streams: medical devices for people who would be totally unable to get around without them, assistive devices for people who have difficulty moving around and wearable bots that can boost a wearer’s ability to carry loads or perform other tasks not normally manageable by a lone human.”

More interesting than the “robots are taking all our jobs”-angle. Instead – augmented humans.

Hyundai’s future mobility plans include wearable robotic assistants

Attempting consciousness

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Medium

A challenge worth taking on.

“If you’re aware enough to give yourself a choice, you can choose to look differently at this fat, dead-eyed, over-made-up lady who just screamed at her little child in the checkout line — maybe she’s not usually like this; maybe she’s been up three straight nights holding the hand of her husband who’s dying of bone cancer, or maybe this very lady is the low-wage clerk at the Motor Vehicles Dept who just yesterday helped your spouse resolve a nightmarish red-tape problem through some small act of bureaucratic kindness. Of course, none of this is likely, but it’s also not impossible — it just depends on what you want to consider.”

I received a book copy of This is Water by David Foster Wallace from a friend a few years ago. It is a brief, yet profound, read. One that I’ve come back to several times, and lately even more often.

It’s a commencement speech that encourages the listeners to attempt to be conscious and resist the — often inevitable — default setting of viewing the world through your standard lens. To not draw the obvious and immediate conclusions in the split second you have to assess a situation.

I think it sidesteps the cliché trap in that it so clearly acknowledges the difficulties and impracticalities of living this way. It’s hard. Arguably impossible. But the aspirational trait of not always letting your default view become your reality is something I’m trying to get better at.

Whether you tell it or not — the story gets told

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Medium

If you don’t tell the story, then a story gets told in its place anyway. Likely a different one than you intended.

A friend and colleague reminded me of this old saying the other day. It is very true in internal business communication, where not communicating sometimes makes the loudest noise. This is easy to forget even if you know that it is the case.

With this in mind, I’m going to start writing more often. If I don’t tell my story, what story is then told in its place?

More than anything else, this seems like a missed opportunity. I like writing since it challenges me in ways that I can avoid too easily when I’m not doing it. It requires an opinion and a take on certain issues that otherwise would have been easier to just let slide. But when doing this, I not only miss out on the feedback — I also don’t expect enough of my own thinking. Publishing makes it official in a different way. I’ve missed that.

So with that — let’s start filling in the blanks of that story.

Our struggles determine our successes

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Our culture would tell me that I’ve somehow failed myself, that I’m a quitter or a loser. Self-help would say that I either wasn’t courageous enough, determined enough or I didn’t believe in myself enough. The entrepreneurial/start-up crowd would tell me that I chickened out on my dream and gave in to my conventional social conditioning. I’d be told to do affirmations or join a mastermind group or manifest or something.

But the truth is far less interesting than that: I thought I wanted something, but it turns out I didn’t. End of story.

I wanted the reward and not the struggle. I wanted the result and not the process. I was in love not with the fight but only the victory. And life doesn’t work that way.

Who you are is defined by the values you are willing to struggle for. People who enjoy the struggles of a gym are the ones who get in good shape. People who enjoy long workweeks and the politics of the corporate ladder are the ones who move up it. People who enjoy the stresses and uncertainty of the starving artist lifestyle are ultimately the ones who live it and make it.

This is not a call for willpower or “grit.” This is not another admonishment of “no pain, no gain.”

This is the most simple and basic component of life: our struggles determine our successes. So choose your struggles wisely, my friend.

Babies show no preference

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Gender preferences for toys only show up after children learn about their gender. Babies show no preference, Brown says.

In fact, when it comes to the actual toys kids like to play with, there is more variability within a gender than there is between genders, says Sweet. For example, she points out that studies of young children have shown that boys are no more likely than girls to enjoy playing with a toy with wheels, something traditionally given to boys.

Tea-time

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Few things have changed as much as the British appetite for tea. Tea consumption per person has fallen consistently since the early 1970s, plummeting from almost 68 grams per week in 1974 to only 25 grams per week in 2014, as shown in the chart at the bottom right. The plunge of more than 63 percent is one of the biggest among all beverages in the country. Only the consumption of malt drinks and coffee essences (whatever those are), have fallen by more.